Alcohol as a Preservative in Skin Care

Written by: | | 81 responses

Alcohol has received a lot of bad press when it comes to skincare, personal care & cosmetics. So why on earth would Essential Wholesale & Labs use it as a preservative in our premium quality Organically Preserved Bases? Well, I can tell you that it is with extreme fondness that we use this. Not only is it an efficacious, nontoxic and natural preservative, but it also enhances the delivery of phytochemicals in the herbs and flowers extracted using the alcohol.

Essential uses domestically produced, food grade, certified organic grain alcohol (Ethanol), natural essential oils, and pure plant extracts to maintain the life of time-challenged products. All of our Organically Preserved Bases are stabilized with these wholesome natural ingredients. Bacteria, yeasts, and molds do not grow in an ethanol concentration of approximately 15-20% or greater. Alcohol also serves as a natural emulsifier, preservative, and carrier, helping ingredients in their delivery. Alcohol, derived from the fermentation of starch, sugar, and other carbohydrates, can also be used to extract and preserve botanicals, not just finished bases. And, unlike the isopropyl alcohol in your first aid kit, ethanol alcohol is not drying to the skin when it is part of a moisturizing base.

Using Certified Organic Alcohol

Certified organic alcohol, also known as ethanol (not to be confused with isopropyl, or rubbing alcohol), is said to be able to extract more phytochemicals than other substances used for extraction, such as glycerin, propylene glycol or water. With a wider spectrum of botanical phytochemicals present, the end product is richer, more opulent and yummier! Alcohol is also an effective emulsifier and carrier, helping ingredients penetrate the skin. Objections to alcohol in skin care products usually cite the tendency of alcohol to dry the skin.

Ethanol Structure

When Essential creates products using organic alcohol we purposefully formulate them not to be drying. For example, our Paramount Facial Moisturizer is formulated with soothing organic aloe juice, organic coconut oil, calming rose water and emollient organic jojoba oil and many other ingredients your skin will love, like MSM, DMAE, and hyaluronic acid. The Paramount Moisturizer is preserved with organic alcohol extracts of rooibos leaf and pomegranate seed, but with a plentiful amount of moisturizing ingredients the last thing the Paramount Moisturizer will do is dry out your skin! My mum, who is quite sensitive to some very well-known solvent preserved products absolutely loves our entire Paramount Line.

Isn’t Alcohol Drying?

Reports about alcohol being drying or otherwise harmful to the skin are usually based on a 100% concentration of alcohol applied to the epidermis. Repeatedly applying alcohol directly to the skin over an extended period will very likely have an adverse effect on the skin. It is important to take into account the difference between applying alcohol directly to the skin and applying a product primarily made of either a combination of or have at least moisturizing oils, butters, glycerin and juices in which alcohol is only one component. For example, imagine having two shots of tequila on an empty stomach. How would you feel? Now imagine those two shots of tequila, diluted into two pint glasses of orange juice and drunk while one’s stomach is full. Diluting the tequila in juice and drinking it on a full stomach dramatically changes the intensity of the alcohol’s effect our body and will likely result in a very different experience. One might also take into consideration the difference between splashing raw alcohol in one’s face versus applying a luxurious moisturizing crème preserved with alcohol extracts to your face. Even a toner or astringent that contains a higher percentage of alcohol also contains emollients and humectants. I guarantee the effect is not the same.

Reports of the negative drying effects of alcohol do come from personal experience of health care workers. In high-demand situations, such as in most critical-care units, or at times of overcrowding or understaffing, promoting hand cleaning with an alcohol-based hand rub solution seems to be the most practical means of improving sanitation. It requires less time, acts faster, irritates hands less often, and is superior to traditional hand washing or medicated hand antiseptic agents. However, many healthcare workers complain about unacceptable skin irritation caused by alcohol-based hand rubs. In spite of the complaint, when the irritant effect of alcohol on the skin has been evaluated, most authors found low toxicity (Boyce et al., 2000; de Haan et al., 1996; Lübbe et al., 2001; Winnefeld et al., 2000). It was pointed out that the skin irritation of healthcare workers is not simply caused by alcohol antisepsis but by combined damage resulting from the alcohol antisepsis dissolving lipids in the stratum corneum, the removal of lipids from the skin surface by detergent washing, and the skin becoming over-hydrated from wearing gloves. To reduce the adverse effects of alcohol-based hand rubs, it is shown that adding emollients or humectants is efficacious (Many studies are reviewed in Boyce & Pittet, 2002).

Is Alcohol a Carcinogenic?

Some people express concern over reports that alcohol is carcinogenic, and there is certainly evidence to support this. The World Health Organization has stated “There is sufficient evidence for the carcinogenicity of alcoholic beverages in humans…Alcoholic beverages are carcinogenic to humans (Group 1).” Note, alcoholic beverages are carcinogenic. Our bodies metabolize alcohol in several stages. The first stage occurs when the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase converts the alcohol into acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde is an estimated 30 times more toxic than alcohol and the sickness associated with hangovers and alcohol poisoning are the result of the accumulation of acetaldehyde in the body.

Acetaldehyde is fairly quickly converted into acetic acid and then to carbon dioxide, but so long as an individual has a build-up of toxic acetaldehyde in their body, they will have to endure some very unpleasant sensations. Heavy drinkers chronically have excesses of acetaldehyde in their bodies and over the years the acetaldehyde will make them increasing vulnerable to cancers, especially of the gastrointestinal tract.

However, you might also read that alcohol itself is NOT a carcinogen but under certain conditions is a co-carcinogen and/or tumor promoter. Read those “certain conditions” and you will note it has nothing to do with alcohol in skincare that is laden with other ingredients that are high antioxidants. Yes, it is true that alcohol is absorbed by the skin and that acetaldehyde is produced by the oxidation of alcohol absorbed through the skin. But let’s keep a sense of scale. Imagine how much alcohol you would have to apply to your skin to become intoxicated. Imagine how much alcohol you would have to apply to your skin to develop an addiction to alcohol. Now imagine how much alcohol you would have to apply to your skin for your body to produce enough acetaldehyde to put you at risk for cancer. It is probably obvious to everyone that you could never absorb enough alcohol through your skin to become intoxicated. You could never absorb enough alcohol through your skin to become an alcoholic. And you could never absorb enough alcohol through your skin to produce enough acetaldehyde to make you vulnerable to alcohol-related cancers. Topical use of alcohol cannot be compared to the internal use of alcohol.

Preserving Skin Care Products with Alcohol

Skin care products must be preserved. Preservatives help prevent microbial growth in our products. Contaminated products aren’t pretty, and they’re dangerous. There are countless reports of unpreserved lotions causing contact dermatitis, rashes, and worse. If you make a product with water, you need a preservative. Preservative options, even parabens, have contraindications in products such as not being able to work with different types of ingredients, whether they’re ionic, cationic, fatty alcohols, fatty acids or their pH range is too tight, just to name a few. In this day and age of people wanting all-natural preservation systems but not wanting parabens and in this day and age of people wanting to be claiming ‘preservative free’ ethanol seems to be the most logical option. Whatever bad press organic alcohol may have received, we still feel it is the safest and most effective natural preservative for our choicest bases.

 

Subscribe
Notify of
81 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Manjari Saha
5 years ago

Hi,
Some of your products use Neem Oil and Vitamin E as a preservative. You have several versions of these. Can you point me to the right ones to buy and also the proper amount to use to preserve? I would like to use these in my salt scrubs. (No sugar)

M D
5 years ago

“Bacteria, yeasts, and molds generally do not grow in an ethanol concentration of approximately 15-20% or greater.”

Does it have to have that much to kill germs? Is it safe to use a toner, for example, that contains only 10% alcohol and no other preservatives, and is there a difference in the amount of methanol and ethanol needed?

Laura Badcock
5 years ago

Hi M.D.

It has been shown that alcohol must be at a high quantity to kill germs. As you will notice, isopropyl alcohol is sold as a 70% solution for wound care. Most all “anti-bacterial” hand gels contain 56-67% alcohol. In skincare, if the product is made with de-ionized or distilled water, then 15-20% is said to be useful.
Now, with that said, you asked about toners. If a toner contains only 10% alcohol, then the other ingredients must be safe for warding off growth or the toner will only have a very short shelf life and most likely will need to be kept in the fridge. If the 10% alcohol toner is made with a distillate that is already preserved, it might be fine. If the 10% alcohol toner is made with other ingredients that ward off growth you might be fine.
Never use methanol in a skin care product. Methanol is HIGHLY toxic. Ethanol is created from the fermentation of food crops, while methanol is a highly poisonous chemical produced synthetically.

Devon Gayle
1 year ago
Reply to  Laura Badcock

Hello Laura,
When you say in the previous comment that “…15-20% is said to be useful”, do you mean that 15-20% 0f the total formulation should contain ethanol, or is it that the actual concentration of the ethanol being used as the preservative may be at a concentration of 15-20%?
Also, is it ok to calculate the amount of ethanol I would need as a preservative based on the water portion of my formulation only or should I consider all parts of my formulation including essential oils, fragrances etc.?

Admin
1 year ago
Reply to  Devon Gayle

Hi Devon,

I asked Laura and she said 15-20% alcohol would be needed to preserve the ENTIRE formula. Every thing added no matter what it is, would be representative of what needs to be preserved.

Cheers,
Brandon

Maggie
4 years ago

Is the Organic Alcohol used in your products (like the Vitamin Rich Moisturizer and Setting Spray) vegan?

April
3 years ago
Reply to  Maggie

I’ve never heard of meat liquor LOL

Rebekah Bolding
4 years ago

Where can we buy this alcohol

brian p
2 months ago
Reply to  Laura Badcock

Laura,

Does it have to be 190 proof? I’m noticing that Vodka is 80 proof?

Admin
2 months ago
Reply to  brian p

Hi Brian!

When it comes to using Alcohol As a preservative in skincare, 190 proof is ideal. That is what we use in our products here at EWL. Anything less than that would require you to alter your formula to account for the additional water coming from the vodka.

Cheers!
-Brandon.

4 years ago

Can I use your witch hazel as a preservative? Considering it is 14% alcohol as appose to a 15-20%. I am also planning on using neem, tea tree, rosemary and vitamin e as antioxidants. The water in the formulation I would be using would be due to making aloe leaf juice with your aloe powder. Thank you

ELHAM
4 years ago

Hi
How long could we keem cosmetic product with 15%Ethanol?

Niyati
4 years ago

HELLO,
Will it not give a peculiar smell to the formulation? Also Can i please know in what percentage we can use Alcohol as a preservative for bathing and cleansing products?

Samantha Constantine
4 years ago

So which product do you recommend?

Kim
4 years ago

Hi I have an ethyl alcohol in my house.
It is 70% solution and the brand is greencross.

Should I used it? And if yes.
How many percent of the alcohol should I use to preserve an homemade toner composing only of pure green tea diluted in water? Thank you very much ❤️

Laura Badcock
4 years ago

Hi Kim,

Even though it’s a less than 3.5% on each of the Isopropyl and the Methanol, I personally don’t recommend them for use in skin care, especially a toner that might be spritzed. Now, that is just my opinion as many lines use denatured alcohol in their products. If I was to use a denatured alcohol, I’d use an alcohol that had been denatured with an essential oil.
Isopropyl is known for drying the skin, so that isn’t the biggest deal to me since it’s only in below 3.5%, but Methanol itself is very toxic, unlike ethanol, and unfit for consumption. Honestly, if you have Vodka in the house, I’d suggest using that (-:
Funny you should ask about using tea as a toner because just this morning I went to empty out my tea pot that had tea in it from Sunday (4 days ago) and it had a lot of mold in it already. Water and tea don’t last without preservation. So I’d suggest following guidelines of no less than 15% ethanol addition to your water and green tea. Hope that helps. Please feel free to email me anytime. ~ Laura

Takiara
3 years ago

Hi your papaya & Pineapple Masque contains a lot of alcohol it’s the second ingredient missing I love the mask only problem that it burns like a stinging sensation when on skin. And I’m guessing it’s from the high alcohol content. Is their something I can add to take the burning/stinging away?

Anne
3 years ago

Hello, I have created a perfume using organic vodka, as my base. I am very pleased with the out come. and as far as brewing teas I have brewed and definatly use a preservative after I mix with my oils.

Anne

V
3 years ago
Reply to  Laura Badcock

im currently using an oil base, what does the organic alcohol do for the perfume?

Richardo
3 years ago

I am looking to do an extraction from Roobios Tea using ethyl alcohol . If I keep the percentage of alcohol in my final product at 15% should this be adequate to preserve the face lotion?

Bharat shah
3 years ago

I want to prepare rose water ( water + rose perfume ) may I use Isi propyl alcohol as a preservative & in how much percentage ? Pl guide me.

Sam
3 years ago

Hi there!

Great article. Personally, I trust organic grain alcohol more than any preservative I’ve done research on. However, instead of using 15-20% ethanol, could I mix this with glycerin for a preservative? For example, 10% glycerin and 10% alcohol?

Thank you!

Laura
3 years ago

Hi!

Great article. I noticed you mentioned preforming a shelf life and preservative efficacy test. Do you have more information on how to go about doing so?

Thanks,
Laura

Alsu
3 years ago

Hello!
I would like to use enzyme tincture in my cosmetic DIY products; however, I can’t find info on how to do that. I’ve got ALA liquid and Enzyme tincture from you like 2 years ago)) and didn’t realize they were in grain alcohol. What would be the way to use them? Can I use them in creams? What’s the percentage? And what preservative will go well with it? (meaning would alcohol interfere with any preservative?) Thank you so much!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Anya
3 years ago

I love coming across this article!
Would you add the alcohol to a cream into the water heating phase or the cooling phase towards the end?
Thank you
Anya

Jade
3 years ago

If I made a Rosewater by simmering (distilled water simmered with organic rose petals), Can I preserve it with vodka, and if so, what’s the longest it could last on the shelf?

Keryn Cameron
3 years ago

I am making room sprays can i use half of this product which is a base with Cosmetic Grade Ethanol, Demineralised Water, Glycerine & Antioxidants. and half demineralized water again – will i have to use a preservative with this base?

Joe
3 years ago

Is it legal to sell and/or ship products containing food grade alcohol like the grain alcohol you describe? This article seems to say absolutely not.

http://bathbodysupply.blogspot.com/2009/10/beverage-alcohol-cosmetics-whats-law.html

Joe E
3 years ago

Is it legal to sell and/or ship products containing food grade alcohol like the grain alcohol you describe? This article seems to say absolutely not.

http://bathbodysupply.blogspot.com/2009/10/beverage-alcohol-cosmetics-whats-law.html

Mercia Coetzee
3 years ago

Hi Laura, my sister and I are formulating a cream that has proven to assist in healing some skin conditions like Carcenoma tumors. We use a tea made from destilled water and herbs, but we use a aqua base cream and also surgical spirits to preserve our cream, we changed to Ethanol instead and would like to know if we can wrather make a tinkture and not use water at all. What amount of alcohol will we have to use to do this? As we use 750 ml of water to make a tea. How much alcohol will have to use to replace the water?

Admin
3 years ago
Reply to  Mercia Coetzee

Hi Mercia, Laura will email you directly once she is back from out of town. Thanks for your great question!

Pasha
2 years ago

Hi,
Laura
I am vet glad to read your article it’s really helpful for preserving.
I want to know about baby wet wipes preservation,
Which preserver I use for wet wipes preservation…?
We add
Basically we add Chinese made preserver and perfume for making wet wipes Mixture, they don’t put preserver formula on packaging or bottel so I want to make my own preserver for preserving of wet wipes,
We use R.O water between 5 to 7 ppm for making mixture
Kindly inform about wet wipes preserver and also about the quantity.

Alex
2 years ago

Hello. I make beeswax salves with beeswax and oils. Nothing else. I am thinking to put inside the formula alcohol lotion only 5-10%. The ingredients are (alcohol denat 93%, water, peg-7, parfum). Is it nessessary to put preservative or its safe? Sorry for my bad english.

Angela
2 years ago

I want to make body wash how can i do it for glowing skin and preservation thanks

2 years ago
Reply to  Angela

Hi Angela – you might start with our body wash bases and then add additional oils or other additives. The preservation system will be in the body wash already. If you have specific questions, you can always contact our customer service team to get more info. Email them at info@ewlnatural.com

Ed
2 years ago

Hi, I would like to know what percentage of ethyl alcohol should I use to make a face cream moisturizer.. ? Thank you..

2 years ago

Could you please send me your price list and offers?
Thanks

2 years ago
Reply to  Anna

Hi Anna – we don’t have a special price list other than the website. You can sign up for our newsletter. We send out special offers every week through that. You can create a free account and get our newsletter that way. https://www.essentialwholesale.com/account/login

Michelle
2 years ago

Hi Laura
Thanks for your blog. I have been having lots of problems to find the organic alcohol and was wondering if it’s safe to use rubbing alcohol and how much can you use to extend shelf life of cream.
Kind Regards
Michelle

Dipaboli Mandal
2 years ago

Hi Laura
I am using an Ayurveda product which contains alcohol(surasar) for preservatives. I want to know that is it good for my skin or not? Alcohol contains 0.025ml in each 5gm contains ingredients.

susan
2 years ago

Hi,
Will Ethanol at 15-20% prevent mold in a foaming sugar scrub (the base which is foaming bath butter contains water)?

Admin
2 years ago
Reply to  susan

Hi Susan, this one is a little harder since sugar is food for bacteria, and the water in your product has bacteria that will feast on the sugar. Ethanol at at least 15% might work, otherwise we would suggest phenoxyethanol or best of all, Optiphen Plus and 1% to be sure. Hope that helps, and thanks for your question!

Camila Cid
2 years ago

Hello,

I like to use vinegary Kombucha (Kombucha made with green tea that has aged for over 30 days) as a deodorant. It keeps growing the yeast and I can see the strains in the jar. I have never had a problem with it, it works well for me and also makes my armpits skin amazingly soft.
It does have a PH of around 2.5 to 3.5
Can I use Ethyl Alcohol to help prevent the growth? How much of it should I use?
Thank you
best

Admin
2 years ago
Reply to  Camila Cid

Hi Camila, yes, Ehtyl Alcohol should help prevent growth, and at or above 15% sounds about right. You might consider raising the pH slightly so it’s closer to skin’s natural pH–5 or at least 4 is a decent goal to help maintain your acid mantle. Thanks for the question!

Amanda
2 years ago

Hi Laura,

I make plain soapberry shampoo for friends and family with only guar gum as additive for thickening as it seems to benefit all hair types. I save the herb additives for the ACV conditioners I make and thicken them with guar gum as well.

I was using Leucidal SF for preservative but after reading this I am curious if I could use the recommended 15% vodka (100 proof) if it would still keep the benificial properties of the shampoo.

Also considering the ingredients I use for the ACV conditioner have preservatives in them (aloe,glycerine,herbs extracted with alcohol, vinegar and glycerine) would you still recommend the 15% for this to stay on the safe side? Would the extra alcohol cancel out or ruin the benefits of the ingredients?

2 years ago
Reply to  Amanda

Hi Amanda, I’m so sorry I missed this comment. I’ll get your question over to Laura.

2 years ago
Reply to  Val Sanford

Here’s the response from Laura, our chief formulator.

Unfortunately, in this of the shampoo case, I believe the alcohol will completely break the guard gum apart, but the BEST way to know for definite is to make yourself a one pound batch experiment.
As for the conditioner, do you know what your final
pH is? You may or may not need that preservation boost. Hard to tell without all the details.

2 years ago

How long of a shelf life does it give you with organic alcohol with a 20% ratio?

Terri
1 year ago

When making a tincture of dry or fresh herbs and alcohol, how do you calculate the percentage of alcohol left in the tincture? Do the herbs reduce the percentage of alcohol by weight because of the infusion? Or would you still use 10-20% of the tincture and consider all of the remaining liquid to be fully alcohol?

Admin
1 year ago
Reply to  Terri

Hi Terri,

I’m not sure I completely understand the question. Are you asking how to calculate the yield when making a tincture?
Let me know and I’ll find out for you.

-Brandon

Terri
1 year ago
Reply to  Brandon Paul

If I start out with (for example) 100 ml of alcohol, add 5 g of herbs, let sit to tincture and strain off, would I still have the same strength of alcohol remaining after straining or do the herbs in some way reduce that? Would I need to use a higher percentage of alcohol to achieve the same preservation strength? I guess I’m asking if the herbs reduce the strength of the alcohol as they infuse and create a need to use a higher percentage of alcohol to get the same preservative effect. I hope that makes a bit more sense 🙂

Admin
1 year ago
Reply to  Terri

Ok I see what you’re asking.

The alcohol preservation will not be decreased by the amount of herbs used to make a tincture.
No matter what, when the herbs are strained out of the product, what is left is still alcohol.
That being said, we suggest using dried material when making a tincture to avoid any contamination due to water content in fresh materials.
As long as there is 15% alcohol or more in the tincture it should be preserved.

And as always, we recommend sending the final product to a lab for preservative efficacy testing.

Cheers!
-Brandon

Terri
1 year ago

Thank you! That is exactly what I wanted to know!

Admin
1 year ago
Reply to  Terri

Glad we could help 🙂

If you have any more questions you’re looking to get answered then just leave us a comment and we will get you what you need to know.

Cheers!
-Brandon

joe K
1 year ago

I make a thick cream, basically, coconut oil shea butter and a bit of infused almond oil. I will typically add a little bit of alcohol tincture from some various plant. I never Add Water at this point. Shelf life being very long. When I use the scream I put some in my hand and then add water and mix it together and rub it as a body lotion. This way I avoid adding the water in the actual mix

Admin
1 year ago
Reply to  joe K

Nice, Joe! Sounds like you’ve got it figured out.

Stephen
1 year ago

Hi, I am asked to mixed 95% Ethyl Alcohol with either mineral or distilled water to get a 70% solution. Can this be used as an antiseptic/disinfection spray. Are there any possible negative reactions to the said solution? such as allergic reaction, drying of sprayed area. Thanks

Admin
1 year ago
Reply to  Stephen

Hi Stephen!

Brandon from EWL here.

As a cosmetic company, I cannot speak to antiseptic or disinfection, as that is a drug term, but I can state that we use a 70% alcohol solution for sanitizing. Disinfection and antiseptic are not the same as sanitizing.

If you have any more questions then let me know.

Cheers!
-Brandon

DD
1 year ago

I am extracting aloe vera gel from fresh plant to prepare alcohol based hand sanitizer. Do I need to put any preservative to the mix if I want to use it upto 6 month or a year?

Admin
1 year ago
Reply to  DD

Hi DD,

Brandon from EWL here!

The alcohol should work fine as a preservative once added to the aloe, and you shouldn’t have to add anything else. Just make sure you mix the aloe juice with the alcohol pretty quickly after extracting it from the plant so that it can be preserved. The minimum alcohol content should be around 25% of your final product’s weight, but you should always have your own preservation testing done just to be safe.

Let me know if you have any more questions!

Cheers,
Brandon

Lo
1 year ago

Hi,

I love to mix aloe and a few drops of avocado oil in my hands and then apply onto skin.
The aloe I use is preserved with 2% Leuconostoc (radish root ferment filtrate).

I would like to make a simple light “hand lotion” that has 80-90% aloe with 20-10% avocado oil and just shake it before I use it and emulsify it mechanically by rubbing the lotion onto my hand.
Would I need to add any alcohol to that formula to act as a preservative or will the lotion be stable without adding anything? (since the aloe has the Leuconostoc and the avocado oil is stable on its own)
If you recommend to add grape ethyl alcohol, please let me know what percentage.

Thank you so much!

Admin
1 year ago
Reply to  Lo

Hello Lo, Brandon from EWL here!

I would recommend that you have a preservative efficacy test done on this if you’re going to release it to market. My first inclination is to say that in theory it would work as is, but since aloe is a big fan of microbial growth, I hesitate to say for definite. There are many 3rd party labs who can help you with this such as Microchem labs in Texas or BioScreen Labs in California to name a few.

Cheers!
-Brandon

Riz Nizami
1 month ago

Hi Laura, thanks so much for helping the community of makers and creators – just amazing. I am a hairstylist from Sydney Australia and want to make a leave-in conditioner for hair. My ingredients are rose water, wheat protein isolates, carrier and essential oils and Glyceryl cocoate (as emolument). I managed to get organic ethanol (95%). what % of the 95% ethanol you think I should be using alcohol in the overall formula? Also, since I am trying to make everything natural, is there any natural emolument you would recommend? thanks so much for your help.

Admin
1 month ago
Reply to  Riz Nizami

Hi Riz!

Your ingredients sound like they would make a lovely leave in conditioner!

If you are wanting to preserve your conditioner with alcohol, use a minimum of 15% in your formula, but you should also send to a 3rd party lab for preservative efficacy testing to make sure your conditioner is well preserved.

You could at Stearyl Alcohol (this is a fatty alcohol) for increased stability and conditioning, you could also add fordii oil – it’s a copolymer and would feel so good in the hair.

Anyways, good luck and please let us know how your conditioner turns out!

Cheers!
-Brandon